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CDC Research Indicates Preventable Deaths Have Decreased in Recent Years

CDC Research Indicates Preventable Deaths Have Decreased in Recent Years

Preventable or premature deaths that could have potentially been avoided have declined between 2010 and 2014 for three of the five leading causes of death in the U.S. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that these estimates provide valuable information to help state and federal officials establish preventative goals, priorities, and strategies. “These results are intended for states to better understand the national picture to help them improve local prevention efforts,” said Captain Michael Iademarco, director of CDC’s Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services.”

The five leading causes of death for those under 80 years of age were a disease of the heart, cancers, stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases (CLRD), such as asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema), and unintentional injuries (accidents). These accounted for 63% of deaths in 2014, CDC researchers said. Many of these deaths, according to the CDC were preventable including; approximately 15 percent of cancer deaths, 30 percent of these heart disease deaths, 43 percent of these unintentional-injury deaths, 36 percent of these CLRD deaths, and 28 percent of these stroke deaths.

When comparing the deaths from 2010, with those in 2014, the potentially preventable deaths from cancer decreased 25 percent (this includes new findings that approximately 12 percent of the lung cancer deaths that were previously counted are determined to be age related). Potentially preventable stroke-related deaths decreased by 11 percent, heart diseased by 4 percent, unintentional injuries 23 percent (largely due to deaths from drug poisoning and falls), and CLRD by 1 percent.

The CDC officials said that health care providers can help patients to prevent premature deaths by offering preventative services such as counseling for smoking cessation, providing education on how to prevent heart disease and strokes, and how to avoid unintentional injuries. “These results are intended for states to better understand the national picture to help them improve local prevention efforts,” said Captain Michael Iademarco, director of CDC’s Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services.”

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Christie Martin

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